Balance and Stability Exercises: Tips for Core Workouts

Balance and Stability Exercises: Tips for Core Workouts


Many people, when starting their fitness journey, are drawn to the machines at the gym that only isolate a single muscle at a time. This is really common, and the truth is, we oftentimes don’t really know any better. We think that by going to the gym to better our health we should be using those machines for our fitness training workouts. But that’s not the most effective way to work out.

The truth is, the foundation of your fitness routine should be stability and balance exercises to…

  • activate and strengthen the core and the many stabilizing muscles
  • improve coordination
  • decrease the risk of injury
  • work to eliminate overcompensations that probably have developed over time

And, there are so many effective bodyweight exercises you can do to build this foundation without ever even stepping foot into a gym. Hooray for time and money saved, right?

In this article, you will find basic information on stability and balance training, plus 12 core stability exercises for your next workout:

What Is Stability and Balance Training?

This kind of training is performing an exercise in what we call in the fitness industry a proprioceptively enriched environment. To put it in layman’s terms: an unstable environment.

This can be performing an exercise…

  • while balancing on one leg
  • standing on a pillow
  • BOSU ball
  • or even a rolled-up yoga mat

Stability and balance training demands a lot of core activation and attention (it’s impossible to be on your phone or have a conversation while doing this type of training – so you’ll have to save your selfies until after you’re done) you can take a selfie after). If you want to get a feel for stability and balance training, you can try balancing on one leg while brushing your teeth!

Think like a kid

As a kid, most of us were running, jumping, climbing, landing on one foot, balancing on a balance beam or on the edge of a sandbox…are you getting the mental picture here? We were doing balance and stability exercises without even realizing it. As adults, we’re not climbing all over the place anymore (unfortunately!), balancing and activating our core as we should.

As a result, many of us have a weak core and distressed lower back, and have adopted many movement compensations (favoring one side while walking, standing, sitting, and even while training). Have you adopted any of these bad habits? Not sure? Don’t worry – there are ways to fix it with core stability exercises.

How Often Should You Incorporate This Type of Training?

Aim for one to two workouts per week. This goes for beginners all the way up to advanced athletes. It’s very important that pros improve stability as well.

The 12 Best Balance and Stability Exercises 

1. Single-Leg Deadlift

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Start the single-leg deadlift in a standing position. Keep your core engaged. Now slowly move one leg back by keeping it straight. Simultaneously, move your torso forward until it’s parallel to the floor, with your arms straight and at shoulder height, perpendicular to the floor. To come up, pull your back leg forward, and lift your torso until you are back in a standing position. Switch sides and repeat.

2. Speed Skaters

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Train your balance and stability with speed skaters! Start in a standing position with your feet hip-width apart. Now shift your weight to your right leg and move your left leg off the floor. Engage your standing leg as you balance with your left leg slightly behind you. Then jump back to the left foot, in the opposite direction. While doing this, your arms are swinging from side to side like a speed skater.

3. Single Leg Squats (SL Squats)

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Stand straight on one foot if you want to do single leg squats. Bend the opposite leg by bringing it up in front of you, slightly bent at the knee. Now slowly bend your standing leg into a squat position keeping your knee stable and in line with your ankle. After you’ve completed all reps on one leg, switch sides and repeat.

4. Lunge & Twist

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Start in a standing position with your feet together. Keep your core engaged and your chest up. Step your right foot forward into a lunge position. The front knee is perpendicular to the floor, keeping it in line with the ankle and behind the toes. Hold the lunge position, keeping your hips, knees, and legs still while twisting your upper body towards the right from your midsection. Step back into the starting position and repeat the lunge and twist on the opposite side.

Tip:

For more intensity, you can hold a weight.

5. Single Leg Jump Squats (SL Jump Squats)

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Single leg jump squats made easy! Standing on one foot, slightly bend the opposite leg, keeping your foot slightly elevated, lifting at the knee. Keep your core engaged while pushing your bent leg back behind you, slightly squatting with your standing leg. Swing your leg forward, lifting your knee up as you jump off of your standing leg, your arms slightly bent and swinging with the movement. Switch sides and repeat.

6. Lunge to Front Kick

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Start in a standing position with your core engaged. Step one leg back into a lunge position. Swing the back leg forward in front of you, pushing through the front heel to power a kicking motion. Be sure to engage the glute muscle of your standing leg. Switch sides and repeat the lunge to front kick. 

7. Side Plank Oblique Crunch

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For the side plank oblique crunch, lie on the floor on one side, stacking your elbow directly under your shoulder. Lift your bottom hip up as high as you can while tucking your hips under to stay as straight as possible. Lower your hip back towards the floor, making sure not to touch the ground, and lift back up. Repeat the set on the other side.

8. Limb Raise Push-ups

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Limb raise push-ups can improve your balance and stability. For this exercise, perform a push-up while keeping your hips square to the ground at all times. At the top of the push-up, lift your opposite leg and arm while engaging your core. Your hips and shoulders should move at the same rate, controlling the movement as you raise your arm to shoulder height and lift your leg above hip-level. Be sure to keep your core engaged throughout the entire exercise. 

9. Low Plank Crunches

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Low plank crunches are another great stability exercise. When performing these crunches, it is important to find a steady pace, not moving too fast.   Starting in a plank position, make sure only to elevate your hips slightly, placing your elbows directly under your shoulders. Your core, glutes, and legs are engaged when bringing your opposite knee and elbow together, slightly touching underneath your midsection. 

Tip:

You can modify this exercise with a bodyweight exercise that’s called quadruped knee to elbow:

 

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10. One-Legged 4 Count Burpees

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The one-legged 4 count burpee is an advanced bodyweight exercise, so make sure to execute it correctly. Your hands should be directly under your shoulders in a plank position, and your core is engaged. Keeping one leg lifted off the ground for the entire movement, bring your grounded foot forward under your midsection and stand up straight, jumping upwards. Bring your body back into a plank position by lowering back to the floor on one leg, kicking one leg behind you, landing in a single-leg plank. 

11. Single Leg Crab Bridge

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Ever heard about the single leg crab bridge? This intermediate exercise can help you improve your balance and stability. Start by sitting on the floor with your hands slightly behind you, feet on the floor with your knees pointed up at the ceiling. Using one leg, lift your hips off of the floor to shoulder level, lifting your other leg in the air. With your wrists stacked under your shoulders and fingers pointing forward,  push through the heel of your supporting leg. Squeeze your glutes at the top of the bridge position, making sure that the ankle is directly under your knee on the supporting leg. Repeat on the other side.

12. Squat Knee to Elbow Twist

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For the squat knee to elbow twist, start in a standing position with your feet slightly wider than shoulder width apart. Lower your hips into a squat, keeping your elbows up, interlocking your hands in front of you at shoulder height. When you come back up to the standing position, twist at your midsection while lifting up one knee to touch your opposite elbow. Follow your hands with your head, looking forward and keeping your back straight. Alternate sides after each squat.

So, did you try out these stability and balance exercises? If so, you probably noticed that one side is much stronger and more coordinated than the other. That’s normal – just keep practicing to build more strength and balance!

All of these bodyweight exercises can be found in the adidas Training app! Download it today and start improving your balance, stability, and core control!  

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LSF the App is now MOVE.

LSF the App is now MOVE.


MOVE

I am so exited to share the news! LSF the app is now MOVE by Love Sweat Fitness app and it’s waiting for you!

Whether you’re hitting a workout wall or looking to mix it up, it’s time to MOVE with Love Sweat Fitness.

move, workouts for women, at home workouts, easy workouts, 30 minute workouts, tone,

Yupp, I just relaunched my app with a new design and TONS of new features, all created to motivate you daily and help you feel your absolute best!

Ready to MOVE?

Here are a few of my personal faves that have been true game-changers for my own daily workouts.

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  1. 500+ days of workouts Barre, HIIT, yoga, stretching, strength… our fitness library has everything for every goal! Looking for a quick 10 minute booty blast? A 45 minute total body burner? Just tell me a little more about your fitness level and I’ll provide you with a great weekly program! 
  2. Chromecast functionality – After receiving so much feedback, I’m proud to say that you can finally tune into each and every LSF workout on your own TV to crush those big goals on a bigger screen! 
  3. Track your progress photos – Stay motivated and measure your transformation journey visually in the app with the ability to update new photos and even share them out on social with #TeamLSF.

LSF OG?

If you already have a subscription, you don’t need to make any changes and you’ll see it has everything you loved about the original, just better!

Look for the MOVE icon on your dashboard if you have auto app updates or head to your App Store to manually updated LSF the App to MOVE.

New to Love Sweat Fitness?

There are sooooo many other app enhancements to help you reach your fitness goals, so what are you waiting for?! Come sweat with me and start your 7 DAY FREE TRIAL to see for yourself! Download the MOVE app here and get ready to fall into a new season of fitness.

The post LSF the App is now MOVE. appeared first on Love Sweat Fitness.



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7 Exercises for Iliotibial Band Syndrome

7 Exercises for Iliotibial Band Syndrome


Injuries and overuse syndromes are common in runners and can quickly take the fun out of exercise.

One of the most frequent problems runners face is the iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), often just called IT band syndrome, or sometimes referred to as runner’s knee.

Here you can find answers to the most common questions on the problem and seven exercises for preventing and treating this common runner’s ailment:

What Is IT Band Syndrome and How Does It Develop?

The problem of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), often just called IT band syndrome, occurs when the iliotibial band (IT band), which runs along the outside of the thigh, rubs against the knee joint.

When you run, you constantly bend and straighten your knee joint. If your leg is turned slightly inward due to improper form, rubbing occurs. This friction can lead to tightening or inflammation of the fascia of the IT band. This explains why IT band syndrome, sometimes also named under the broad term ‘runner’s knee’, starts out as a dull ache, but over time turns into a stabbing pain on the outside of the knee. This can make simple things like climbing stairs or even walking very painful. It can also put a quick end to your running training.

Please note:

The term runner’s knee is a broad one and therefore, can also be referred to as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). The latter is actually different from the above-mentioned IT Band syndrome: PFPS describes pain in the front of the knee and around the patella or kneecap.

What Are the Causes for IT Band Syndrome?

Improper running technique and worn-out shoes are not the only causes of IT band syndrome.  A lack of strength in the stabilizing muscles of the foot, knee, and hips can also lead to this injury. The weak muscles cannot provide the stability needed during the initial contact and take-off. Regular cross-training can help to prevent imbalances and avoid developing an overuse injury: Try the Running Strong training plan in the adidas Training app to improve your running.

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What Should You Do When ITBS Occurs?

If you are experiencing pains like those described above, stop running for the next ten to 14 days. Give your body and your knee a good rest.

You can focus on recovering and building up strength in your stabilizing muscles with a targeted workout: the most important muscles to strengthen are your core, hips, and glutes. The right balance of mobility and stability is essential for relieving the stress on your IT band.

You can and should, of course, do the workout below to prevent problems before they occur. Doing specific exercises two or three times a week can help avoid muscle weaknesses and imbalances.

7 Effective Exercises to Treat ITBS

The following seven exercises offer you an ideal combo—they reduce muscle tension, improve flexibility and strengthen your stabilizing muscles.

  • You can do them as a separate injury-prevention workout or as part of your recovery routine if you are forced to take a break from running for a while.
  • Afterward, you should be able to continue with your running training pain-free. Take 30 minutes a day to work on correcting the imbalance in these typically weak areas.

Please note:

If you do not see any improvement after treating iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), or runner’s knee, yourself, you should definitely consult a doctor for an accurate diagnosis. Specialists may also be able to clarify other causes of the problems.

1. Release: Reduce Muscle Tension

Exercise 1 – Trigger Release with Ball

Starting position: 

  • Hurdler stretch with your knee bent at a 90° angle.

How to perform the exercise:

  • Position a trigger point ball or a lacrosse ball under the outside of your thigh muscle.
  • Search for the spot in your muscle with the most tension.
  • Now increase the pressure on the ball and slowly rub the tense area in a star pattern. This area should start to hurt less after a while.

Duration:

  • 60-90 seconds per point and side

Exercise 2 – Lateral Quad Roll

Starting position:

  • Lie on your side.
  • Position a foam roller under the thigh of your bottom leg and cross your top leg over with your foot on the floor in front of you.

How to perform the exercise:

  • Roll the muscle slowly at an even pace starting from the knee and working your way up to the hip.
  • Avoid rolling directly over tendons and ligaments so as not to place unnecessary stress on them.

Duration:

  • 60-90 seconds per point and side.

2. IT Band Stretches for Runners: Increase Flexibility

Exercise 1 – Supine Scorpion

Basic Version

Starting position:

How to perform the exercise:

  • Using your left hand pull your right knee to the left and try to push your knee to the floor.
  • Your knee should form a 90° angle between your upper and lower leg.
  • Now reach your right arm up and to the right. You should feel the stretch on the outside of your thigh.

Advanced Version

How to perform the exercise:

  • Starting from the basic version.
  • Now extend your right leg and thus increase the intensity of the stretch on your thigh muscle.

Duration:

Exercise 2 – Pigeon Pose

Basic Version

Starting position:

How to perform the exercise:

  • Bring your right knee forward through your arms as far as you can and place your knee on the mat.
  • The lower part of your right leg should be slightly open, so that your thigh is not resting on your calf.
  • Make sure to keep your front foot flexed.
  • Your left leg should rest comfortably extended behind you and your left hip should be tilted slightly to the right.
  • Now raise your torso until your back is straight and adjust your center of gravity so you feel a comfortable stretch on the outside of your thigh.


Advanced Version

How to perform the exercise:

  • Starting from the basic version, stretch your arms forward and lower your torso toward the floor.
  • This will increase the intensity of the stretch.

Duration:

3. Performance: Build Stability

Exercise 1 – Single Leg Squat Front and Back

Starting position:

  • Stand on one leg.
  • Put your weight onto your right leg and extend your left leg out straight in front of you and low to the floor.

How to perform the exercise:

  • Squat down and try to keep the knee as stable as possible.
  • Hold this position for a few seconds and then push back up to the starting position. (Picture 1)

  • Now extend your left leg straight out behind you and low to the floor.
  • Squat down while once again keeping your knee stable and then push back up to the starting position. (Picture 2)

Duration:

  • 3 x 10 repetitions per side

Exercise 2 – Single Leg Bridge with Resistance

Starting position:

  • Lie on your back.
  • Place your feet hip-width apart.
  • Lift your hips up and assume the shoulder bridge position.

How to perform the exercise:

  • Pushing up through your heel, put your weight on your left leg.
  • Pull your right knee up towards your chest with your hands under the knee joint.
  • Push your leg against your hands to apply resistance.
  • Keep your hips square and then slowly reduce the tension.
  • Let your hips sag and then lift them up high again.

Duration:

  • 3 x 10 repetitions per side

Exercise 3 – Clam Shells with Miniband

Starting position:

  • Lie on your side.
  • Position a miniband between your knee and thigh and bend your knees slightly.

How to perform the exercise:

  • Stabilize your body with your right arm on the floor and then open your knees like a clam. Pull the band apart slowly but firmly and try to engage your hips and core muscles.
  • Let the band pull your legs back together (with control) and then repeat the movement again.

Duration:

  • 3 x 10 repetitions per side

Some Final Words

As soon as you are pain-free for about ten days, you can try an easy test run. You should keep it short and make sure to warm up well. You can find useful tips and stretches for warming up in this blog post. It’s best if you run your test run on a treadmill or do a short, flat loop. This way you can stop at any time if the pain should return again. If everything goes well, you can slowly increase the distance per day. 

Related articles:

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Why Does My Knee Hurt?

Why Does My Knee Hurt?


Does your knee hurt after a run or other workout? It’s not always runner’s knee; you may be suffering from jumper’s knee or pes anserine bursitis. Here you will find an overview of the three most common knee problems and what you can do about them.

3 Common Knee Problems

Step #1: Where Does It Hurt?

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS):

If it hurts on the outside of the knee and extends toward the hip, it is iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), often just called IT band syndrome, or sometimes runner’s knee.

A young male runner suffers from iliotibial band syndrome

Jumper’s knee:

Isolated pain in the front of the knee on the lower pole of the patella is also called “patellar tendinopathy”, or “patellar tendonitis” (jumper’s knee).

Jumper's knee

Pes anserine bursitis:

If pain develops on the inner side of the shinbone directly below the knee joint, it is most likely pes anserine bursitis, also called “pes anserinus syndrome”, “inner knee pain”, or “medial knee pain”.

A young female runner suffers from pes anserine bursitis

Step #2: Which Sport Do You Do?

In order to diagnose which knee problem you suffer from, it is important to look at how you work out. All three knee problems can, indeed, develop in any sport. However, the jumper’s knee – as the name suggests – is more common among athletes who do sports involving jumping (e.g. volleyball) or stop-and-go movements (e.g. tennis, soccer). Runner’s knee and pes anserine bursitis, on the other hand, usually appear in runners.

Step #3: Is Your Knee Tender to the Touch?

Tenderness is present in all three conditions:

  • With the IT band syndrome (also runner’s knee), the tenderness is on the outer side of the knee joint.
  • With the jumper’s knee, the tenderness can be felt in one spot directly on the patellar pole.
  • With pes anserine bursitis (also pes anserinus syndrome, inner knee pain, or medial knee pain) there is tenderness below the inner side of the knee joint.

Step #4: What Can I Do About the Pain in My Knee?

Treatment is necessary for all three conditions: ice and rest your knee! Avoid jumping or impact activities.

Foam rolling exercises and stretching can help. If you suffer from Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), jumper’s knee, or pes anserine bursitis, you can find helpful exercises and tips in the respective blog posts:

In a nutshell, these three knee problems can usually be distinguished by the location of the pain. The type of sport you do can also provide helpful information.

Please consider:

If the condition does not improve after treating it at home, you should definitely consult a medical professional for a clear diagnosis and additional treatment advice.

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Strong Back • 6 Great Back Strengthening Exercises

Strong Back • 6 Great Back Strengthening Exercises


Many people think you need weights or a pull-up bar to train your back, but this simply isn’t true. Bodyweight exercises are also an effective way of strengthening your back muscles. The exercises using your own body weight as resistance are usually very complex and great for activating your stabilizing muscles.

Why Back Strengthening Exercises are Important

A strong back is important for more than just looking good. Working together with your abdominal muscles, a well-conditioned back can protect your spine, improve your alignment, and help you avoid sprains and strains.

A lot of us work a sedentary job, which means we’re typically sitting for hours in a forward-leaning position that puts a lot of stress on our spine. Regular back training can improve your posture and is the most effective method for preventing back pain.

6 Back Strengthening Exercises for a Stronger Back

Today we’d like to show you six great exercises for your next back training:

How to Create a Defined Back With These Exercises:

  • Pick three of the exercises
  • Do three sets per exercise with 90-120 seconds of rest between sets
  • Do 10-12 repetitions per exercise and set (for the plank: hold 30-60 seconds for one set)

1. Superman



2. Superman Pull



For extra resistance:

Hold a resistance band between your hands and stretch it out while pulling your shoulders back.

3. Quadruped Limb Raises



4. Low Plank



5. Bridge



6. Wall Lateral Pulldowns



Do you want to improve your overall fitness and train your entire body? Get the adidas Training app, and find core exercises, HIIT workouts, and more!

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Body Type Workouts >> What You Need to Know!

Body Type Workouts >> What You Need to Know!


Perhaps you’ve heard about the three different body types, also known as the somatotypes, but did you know that it is also important to work out according to your body type?

Your body type is predominantly genetic, but that doesn’t mean you are limited to a certain level of fitness. While it might be unlikely to get that hourglass figure if you are predispositioned to have more of a straight and narrow physique type, there are ways you can train in order to make the most out of your body type and have a healthy fitness level that feels great! 

Note:

Since not all body types are the same, you may not find yourself identifying with one specific body type, and that’s totally normal! Still, this post should give you some guidance on how to train and eat to reach your own individual goals.

What are the 3 body types?

The idea of body types generalizes the shape and composition of the human body, and divides the characteristics into three common categories, known as the three somatotypes.  The three body types are Ectomorph, Mesomorph and Endomorph. You can get a good idea of what these body types look like and where they are prone to build more muscle and store more fat from the image below.

The History Behind The Somatotype Theory

The idea of the three body types was first introduced in the 1940s by Willian Sheldon, a University of Houston professor. After studying hundreds of people’s physiques, he found three extremes of body types – underweight, athletic, and overweight.(1) 

It may seem simple, but his theory was that human physiques fell into one of three categories and that it was impossible for anyone to change or alter their somatotype since it was determined by their skeletal structure.(2) 

Female body types

Modern Research On The Somatotype Theory

Over the years, there have been many studies performed to test Sheldon’s theory. One study looked at kayakers, basketball players, and football players and observed the athlete’s body type patterns in relation to the sport they played and level of performance.(3) 

They found that the high-achieving athletes in each sport had a common body type; high-achieving kayakers fell under the endomorphic body type, the basketball players aligned with the mesomorphic body type, and the football players fell under the ectomorphic body type.(4)

The results of this study concluded that a common somatotype was present in each of the high-achieving athletes in their chosen sport.(5)

On the contrary, there have been other studies that argue that the human physique can’t simply fall into three categories and that there must be either more body types or combinations of the ectomorph, mesomorph, and endomorph body types where someone shows two primary characteristics of two different body types.(6)  

How To Work Out According To The Body Types

Not everybody is going to fit exactly into a single category of body type, but you might notice that there is one type that is more predominant. Let’s break it down a bit further and talk about each body type in more detail as well as how you should approach your fitness training and balanced diet according to your type in order to maximize results.

Male body types

Ectomorph

The Ectomorph is naturally very thin, has narrow hips and shoulders, very low body fat and very thin arms and legs. The Ectomorph might say things like, “No matter how much I eat, I cannot seem to gain weight.” Contrary to popular belief, not everyone is looking to lose weight, as fitness training is also about being healthy. So here are some great tips for fitness training and a balanced diet for the Ectomorphs. 

Ectomorph Workout:

Strength training for the Ectomorph:

  • Train with heavy weights and lots of rest in between sets (2-3 minutes) as well as in between exercises (5 minutes).
  • Only train 1-2 body parts per training day to avoid too much caloric expenditure.
  • Aim for 5-10 reps and 6-8 sets of each exercise.
  • Take plenty of rest in between workouts and never train a muscle group that is sore. And if you’re feeling really sore, try out foam rolling for recovery.

Check out this low-intensity strength training workout on our adidas Training app

Cardio training for the Ectomorph:

  • Very minimal cardio.
  • Moderate and low-intensity bike rides and brisk walks (think of them more as relaxing cardio activities to reduce stress).
  • lower-intensity, total-body workouts like Pilates, dance, and yoga 

Check out this low-intensity cardio training workout on our adidas Training app

Ectomorph Diet and Nutrition:  

  • Opt for well-balanced meals, making sure not to skip meals or trade for snacking.(7) 
  • Diet of moderate proteins, lower fats, and higher carbohydrates. 
  • Starchy carbohydrates like rice, oats, quinoa, and potatoes are a healthier choice.
  • A balanced diet could include oatmeal, fruits, veggies, nuts, lean meats, quinoa. 
  • Avoid highly processed carbohydrates like chips and candy. 

Mesomorph

The Mesomorph body types are able to put on muscle easily, often having strong legs, broad shoulders, and a narrower waist. Generally, they also have very low body fat and are considered to not be overweight or underweight

Mesomorph Workout:

Strength training for the Mesomorph:

  • The more varied the training, the better the results.
  • Light, moderate, and heavy weight training as well as bodyweight training with the adidas Training app.
  • Basic exercises (squats, lunges, deadlifts, rows, chest press, shoulder press, etc.) with heavy weights, followed by isolation exercises with moderate/light weights.
  • Aim for 8-12 reps for most exercises. When it comes to leg training, you can incorporate really heavy weights with around 6 reps and really light or no weights at around 25-30 reps for 3-5 sets.
  • Adding in other strength training activities that you think are fun can add variety to your fitness routine, like this Lower Body Lean With Band resistance band workout.

Check out this strength training workout on our adidas Training app

Cardio training for the Mesomorph:

  • 3 days per week of cardio for 15-30 minutes.
  • Get motivated with a fun and rhythmic with our HIIT workout on our adidas Training app. 

Check out this cardio training workout on our adidas Training app

Mesomorph Diet and Nutrition:

  • Well-balanced and equal distribution of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. 
  • Dinner idea could be grilled chicken breast, baked sweet potato, and roasted veggies.  

Endomorph

The Endomorph body type is more round and pear-shaped and tend to store more body fat throughout the entire body, especially in the legs and arms. Typically, it’s much harder for the Endomorph to put on muscle and much easier to gain weight. However, as mentioned before, health and fitness is possible for all body types despite your genetics. Reaching your goals might take more discipline and time but becoming more fit and healthy is worth the effort of making better choices.

Endomorph Workout:

Strength training for the Endomorph:

  • Total-body workouts with compound movements to burn the most calories. This can be a mix of bodyweight training with the adidas Training app as well as moderate weight lifting.
  • Avoid heavy weight lifting with low reps.
  • Aim for 8-12 reps and 3-5 sets for upper body and 12-20 reps for lower body.
  • After reaching initial weight loss goals, it is okay to start to isolate muscles you want to shape a bit more.

Check out this strength training workout on our adidas Training app

Cardio training for the Endomorph:

Check out this cardio training workout on our adidas Training app

Endomorph Diet and Nutrition:

  • Diet for endomorphs is higher proteins and lower carbohydrates. 
  • Consume food like quinoa, zucchini noodles, hummus, lean meats, and veggies. 

With so much information out there, it can be quite overwhelming to find the right body type workout that best suits your needs. Knowing your fitness body type is a great starting point to help lead you in the right direction. And remember, long-lasting results, regardless of your body type, take time and consistency. So keep it up and make the necessary adjustments as you continue on your fitness journey! 





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